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Vaccinations

Vaccinations are important for all pets. Some infectious diseases are fatal, and vaccinations can protect them from many of these diseases. To be effective, immunizations must be given as a series of injections at prescribed intervals, so it is essential that you are on time for your pet’s scheduled vaccinations. As puppies or kittens, immunizations are started at 6-8 weeks of age and are repeated every 3-4 weeks until they are around 16-20 weeks old. For dogs and cats over 20 weeks of age, their schedule depends on their previous immunization schedule, lifestyle, and exposure risk.

Dog
Canine Vaccinations

This combination vaccine protects against Distemper Virus, Parvovirus, Adenovirus-2, Parvovirus, and Parainfluenza. The earliest a DAPP vaccination can be given is at 6 weeks of age. A booster vaccination should then be administered every 3-4 weeks until 16 weeks of age (or a total of 3 consecutive vaccinations). Puppies and dogs over 16 weeks of age receiving their first vaccination are recommended to have at least 1 additional booster vaccination. 

After the initial series, booster vaccinations are given every year or every 3 years depending on their risk assessment and boarding/grooming requirements.

About:

The most common disease out of the combination is parvovirus. It is transmitted via fecal-oral route and can be fatal in severe cases. It mainly attacks the immune and gastrointestinal system resulting sepsis, dehydration, and shock. The most common signs are lethargy, diarrhea, loss of appetite, and vomiting.

Treatment consists of stopping the vomiting and diarrhea, re-hydration, antibiotics (possibly antivirals) and providing adequate nutrition. For best results, pets are usually hospitalized for a minimum of 3-5 days. 

Prognosis is usually good if pet shows positive signs of recovery after the 3-5 days.

Ragdoll Cat
Feline Vaccinations

This combination vaccine protects against feline viral rhinotracheitis (FVR) caused by feline herpesvirus-1, respiratory disease caused by feline calicivirus (FCV) and feline panleukopenia (FPL) caused by feline parvovirus (FPV). The earliest an FVRCP vaccination can be given is at 6 weeks of age. A booster vaccination should then be administered every 3-4 weeks until 16 weeks of age. Kittens receiving their first vaccination between 16-20 weeks are recommended to have at least 1 additional booster vaccination. Cats greater than 6 months of age when receiving their initial dose only require a single vaccination. 

After the initial series, booster vaccinations are given every year or every 3 years depending on their risk assessment and boarding/grooming requirements.

About:

Each disease is usually transmitted via other infected cats and contaminated environments. Herpesvirus and calicivirus cause upper respiratory signs (sneezing and nasal discharge), as well as conjunctivitis and ulcerations around the head and mouth. Panleukopenia causes lethargy, loss of appetite, vomiting, diarrhea, fever and in some cases can affect the brain causing incoordination.

Treatment for upper respiratory signs usually consist of antibiotics and eye ointments. More severe cases require hospitalization. Those infected with herpesvirus commonly have occasional flare ups during the course of their lives but may be prevented with immune boosters (L-lysine) and antivirals.

For Panleukopenia, treatment consists of stopping the vomiting and diarrhea, re-hydration, antibiotics (possibly antivirals) and providing adequate nutrition. 

In each case, prognosis is usually good if pet shows positive signs of recovery after the 3-5 days.

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